MALEVIČ

Link: http://www.gamec.it/en/exhib/malevic

MALEVIČ

  • Casa rossa, 1932
  • Composizione con la Gioconda, 1914

— 2 October 2015 - 10:00am to 17 January 2016 - 7:00pm

— Curated by: Eugenia Petrova e Giacinto Di Pietrantonio

 

The exhibition will offer an exhaustive portrait of a key 20th-century figure who experienced one of the most intense historical and artistic periods of the era.

It will present approximately 70 works by Kazimir Malevich, alongside a large body of works by leading Russian artists who were part of the art movements of the early 20th century, as well as documents and videos.

For the first time in Italy, GAMeC is hosting the revival of the show Victory over the Sun, the first complete work of music, art, poetry and theatre.

From 2 October 2015 to 17 January 2016, GAMeC – Galleria d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea di Bergamo is hosting an important retrospective devoted to Kazimir Malevich (Kiev, 1878 – Leningrad [St Petersburg], 1935), a key 20th-century figure who experienced one of the most intense historical and artistic periods of the era.

Curated by Eugenia Petrova, Vice-director of the State Russian Museum in St Petersburg, and Giacinto Di Pietrantonio, Director of GAMeC, the exhibition is co-produced by GAMeC and GAmm – Giunti Arte mostre musei, in collaboration with the State Russian Museum in St Petersburg. Unique in its completeness and because of the careful historical and critical investigation it has entailed, it will present approximately 70 works by Kazimir Malevich, alongside a large body of works by leading Russian artists who were part of the art movements of the early 20th century, as well as documents and videos.

Malevich is internationally considered part of the pioneering triad that opened new paths in the art of the 20th century. Whereas Picasso made the biggest contribution to renewal of the figurative tradition and Duchamp of the conceptual tradition, it was Malevich who brought to life the primacy of the tradition of abstract art that is still so decisive today.

He was a key figure for the last century and continues to be today, thanks to his complex production that goes beyond abstract art alone and the birth of Suprematism, a crucial current for the development of 20th century.

In fact, Malevich was a multifaceted artist. After beginning his career as a Symbolist and Neo-Impressionist, after reconsidering the conquests of the art that made inroads in Paris in the late 19th century he embraced the development of Cubo-Futurism, a movement that summed up the conquests of both the French Cubism of Braque and Picasso as well as the Italian Futurism of Balla and Boccioni. This marked an initial path shared by other contemporary Russian artists such as Kandinsky, with whom he participated in the first collective avant-garde exhibitions.

Malevich’s Symbolist period opens the exhibition itinerary, from the 1906 paintings depicting landscapes with rows of trees to the 1907 self-portrait with a red bow, which does not ignore the lesson of the Fauves. These works will be juxtaposed with those preceding them chronologically by the Symbolist master Ilya Repin and coeval works by Natalya Goncharova, Bleaching Canvas (1908), andMikhail Yakovlev, Holy Grove (1904–1907).

It continues with an in-depth section on the 1910s. In fact, in 1913 Malevich worked with other artists to draft the Manifesto of the First Futurist Congress, and designed the sets and costumes for the show Victory over the Sun by Aleksei Kruchenykh with music by Mikhail Matyushin (the exhibition will feature a video and the reconstruction of 19 costumes), in which we can glean the early seeds of Suprematism, with the first hint of Black Square.

This was also the period of famous paintings – all of which on display – such as Cow and Violin (1913), Portrait of Ivan Kliun (1913),Composition with the Mona Lisa (1914) and several drawings from the same years, set alongside the canvases Malorossy(Ukrainians) (1912) by David Burliuk, Composition with an Accordion (1914) by Jean Pougny, and Cyclist (1913) by Natalya Goncharova.

These were the years in which, at the Last Futurist Exhibition 0.10 staged in 1915, Malevich launched Suprematism, aiming to assert the supremacy of the pure sensitivity of art, which would be applied not only in sculpture but also in architecture and design, above all on the level of experimentation and modelling.

In this section we can admire masterpieces such as Red Square (1915) and the coeval Suprematism (1915–1916), and his best-known work, Black Square, along with Black Circle and Black Cross (1923).

The 1920s represented a period of the greatest theoretical expansion for Malevich, who abandoned “the bristling paintbrush for the sharp pen” to devote himself to writing, notes and drawings. This decade concentrated the Suprematist core that revealed far more advanced research with respect to what emerged in the works of other colleagues, such as Portrait of a Philosopher. Cubist Construction (1915) byLyubov Popova and Suprematism by Olga Rozanova. In addition, several Russian icons from the 14th and 15th centuries will be on display, documenting that Malevich drew inspiration from such works.

Alongside Malevich’s pictorial works there will also be examples of his production tied to design and architecture, testifying to the idea of avant-garde total art aimed at eliminating the boundaries between art and life. These include the Architektony plastics from the 1920s that transmit the utopia of the future city imagined at the time, the enamel paintings on porcelain and the canvases-projects for fabrics with Suprematist motifs, which Malevich began to create in 1919, the watercolours Tribune for Orators and Schematic Principle of a Mural Painting (1920), and sketches for Suprematist clothing (1923).

While the Suprematist works are the heart of the exhibition, they do not complete the investigation on Malevich’s artistic evolution, which extended to 1934, a year before his death.

In fact, the exhibition itinerary continues by investigating two other periods, in which we can note the progressive Stalinization of Russia, which censored artists and intellectuals, and pushed them to embrace the dictates of Socialist realism. Forced to remain in Russia, Malevich initially responded to this limitation with figurative art, juxtaposing geometric areas of colour with faces to form male and female mannequins evoking the theatre costumes he designed in 1913. In these, the heads – faceless ovals – marked the effacement of the individual under way during this period, and to a certain extent they evoke the mannequins of Giorgio de Chirico.

Malevich’s research did not give in completely to the dictates of the regime and, indeed, Suprematism continues to be evident in many cases. One example is Red House (1932), in which the wall sustaining the roof is none other than a reference to Red Square.

The exhibition also hosts an important series of works executed in the final years of his life, composed of about fifteen oils in which, despite the assault of the dictatorship, we can see that his painting continues to show innovative and unique expressive power evident in the depiction of the same subjects examined simultaneously by other artists, such as Race (1932–1933) by Aleksandr Deineka,Militarized Komsomol (1932–1933) by Alexander Samokhvalov and Fantasia (1925) by Kuzma Petrov-Vodkin.

This creative and inventive force is also evident in the last section, with a return to a certain “realism”, the subjects of which were at the centre of Malevich’s reflection from his earliest works, particularly those of the working and peasant classes.

For the exhibition, GAMeC’s Educational Department is promoting the project Tutti Pazzi Per Malevich, with the aim of building a network of collaboration linking institutions, associations, offices of the City of Bergamo and the province, uniting them in a network of excellence.

Supported by the Culture Office of the Municipality of Bergamo, the project is a high-quality cultural investment in the city in which GAMeC takes the lead in a new way to make the most of the resources generated by the exhibitions.

All the events will be documented on the website www.mostramalevic.it

Catalogue by GAmm Giunti.

________________________

MALEVIČ
Bergamo, GAMeC
2 October 2015 - 17 January 2016


GAMeC – Galleria d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea di Bergamo
Via San Tomaso, 53 - 24121 Bergamo
Tel. +39 035 270272 - Fax +39 035 236962


Tickets
Full: € 12,00
Reduced: € 10,00
Schools: € 3,00

Opening hours
Tuesday-Sunday: 9 am – 7 pm
Thursday: 9 am – 10 pm
Monday closed; open for schools

Info and reservations (groups and schools):mostramalevic@gamec.it

Internet: www.mostramalevic.it; www.tuttipazzipermalevic.it

Catalogue: GAmm Giunti

Press Office
CLP Relazioni Pubbliche
Francesco Sala, tel. +39 02 36 755 700
francesco.sala@clponline.it; www.clponline.it

Diana Picasso's Giant Paris Show Explores Picasso's Enduring Influence and Power

10/17/15 | by Vilém Stránský [mail] | Categories: ze světa

Link: https://news.artnet.com/art-world/picasso-mania-paris-338244?utm_campaign=artnetnews&utm_source=101115daily&utm_medium=email

Diana Picasso's Giant Paris Show Explores Picasso's Enduring Influence and Power

Emily Nathan, Thursday, October 8, 2015

Exhibition view with sculpture by Maurizio Cattelan at Grand Palais, Paris Photo: © Rmn-Grand Palais / Photo: Didier Plowy, Paris 2015

Exhibition view with sculpture by Maurizio Cattelan at Grand Palais, Paris 
Photo: © Rmn-Grand Palais / Didier Plowy, Paris 2015

Upon ascending the escalators from the ground floor of Paris's Grand Palais this month, visitors are greeted by a world-renowned scowl. Occupying the entire wall at the entrance to the museum's genre-defying fall exhibition, "Picasso Mania"— part group-show, part retrospective, part historical archive—a photograph of the petite, Spanish-born legend of outsized spirit fixes passersby with a pair of black eyes and an impressively furrowed brow. It's an image we all know well, and it acts as a fitting opening salvo to an exhibition that considers one of the defining figures of modern life by exploring the paths he paved for generations of artists who followed him—and those he paves still.

It's fair to say, after all, that the spectre of Picasso haunts us—his name is basically synonymous with "modern art"—but is felt most tangibly by artists seeking to create works of value and resonance in his wake. "This show looks at Picasso not just as an artist but as a public figure with an image that is inspiring—and sometimes crushing," curator Didier Ottinger told press at the preview on Tuesday, explaining that the show is the result of a partnership between the Grand Palais, the Centre Pompidou, and the Picasso Museum.

Exhibition view of works by George Condo at Grand Palais, exhibition design by bGc studio <br>Photo: © Rmn-Grand Palais / Didier Plowy, Paris 2015

Exhibition view of works by George Condo at Grand Palais, exhibition design by bGc studio 
Photo: © Rmn-Grand Palais / Didier Plowy, Paris 2015

To that end, the first gallery introduces the man, the myth, the legend through the eyes of other artists, in a documentary grid of video portraits conceived by director Laure de Clermont-Tonnerre and art historian Diana Widmaier Picasso, the artist's granddaughter.

Facing the camera as though in dialogue with viewers, an impressive array of cultural figures including John Baldessari, Richard Prince, Faither Ringgold, Agnès Varda, Cecily Brown, and Roumauld Hazoumé explain the phenomenon named Picasso. He is described as a "warrior facing his paintings" by Adel Abdessemed and "Kaleidoscopic" by Ed Ruscha; there is no shortage of hyperbolic adulation. In short, as the voices cumulatively assert, all that we call contemporary art exists because of Picasso.

But the hero worship ends there, for the large part, and the following galleries bring to life works by other artists in surprising and inventive ways.

Pablo Picasso Marie-Thérèse au béret bleu (1937) Photo: © Succession Picasso 2015 / Photo Béatrice Hatala

Pablo Picasso Marie-Thérèse au béret bleu (1937) 
Photo: © Succession Picasso 2015 / Photo Béatrice Hatala

Organized to track three primary periods in Picasso's output—his creation of Cubism; his fractured, often figurative and political compositions from the 1930s; and his late works, which are largely erotic in nature—the show features complex and thoughtful juxtapositions that are subtle rather than didactic.

Although Les Demoiselles d'Avignon is not present, Mike Bidlo's impeccable 1984 copy Not Picasso (Les Demoiselles d'Avignon, 1907) is, as are wry riffs on the gendered and post-colonial issues contained within Picasso's original canvas. In Malcolm Morley's Cradle of Civilization with American Woman, 1982, a headless female nude reclines in the foreground of a classic contemporary beach scene, placed in tension with anachronistically painted inserts of ancient female statuary.

Sigmar Polke <i>Untitled </i> (2006) <br>Photo: © The Estate of Sigmar Polke, Cologne / ADAGP, Paris, 2015 - Photo ACT Art Collection Siggi Loch

Sigmar Polke Untitled (2006) 
Photo: © The Estate of Sigmar Polke, Cologne / ADAGP, Paris,
2015 – Photo ACT Art Collection Siggi Loch

A room devoted to Pop argues that artists such as Roy Lichtenstein, Claes Oldenburg, and Andy Warhol treated Picasso just like any other icon—as an object to be consumed, ingested, and then integrated into their own visual vocabulary.

Occasionally, the parcours is given over to a brief consideration of Picasso's hold on a singular artist, including David Hockney and Dutch photographer Rineke Dijkstra, and the related anecdotes are enlightening.In 1988, for example, the late German artist Martin Kippenberger became ensorcelled by a David Douglas Duncan photograph of Picasso standing on the steps of his Cannes home in a pair of enormous white underwear. His obsession persisted—"did Picasso's genius derive from his underwear?" he wondered—and he eventually began a series of works based on a self-portait in which he himself wears similarly generous briefs.

David Hockney Harlequin (1980) Photo: © David Hockney / Richard Shmidt

David Hockney Harlequin (1980) 
Photo: © David Hockney / Richard Shmidt

Jasper Johns, meanwhile, had been a faithful acolyte of Marcel Duchamp's conceptualism in the ‘50s and ‘60s—an interest antithetical to Picasso's pursuits. But his suite of Seasons canvases, begun in 1985, contain subtle references to Picasso's iconagraphy, particularly a looming figurative shadow likely borrowed from Picasso's L'Ombre, 1953, a starry sky, and a ladder, suggesting a shifting allegiance.

The show's last section, "Bad Painting," is devoted to Picasso's late works, which were only appreciated posthumously. Originally shown at thePalais des Papes in Avignon in the early ‘70s, these erotic paintings and drawings of Musketeers making love were badly received and largely ignored. But their exhibition at the Royal Academy of Art in London in 1981, and later at the Guggenheim, proved pivotal for a generation of artists including Jean-Michel Basquiat, Keith Haring, and George Condo.

Roy Lichtenstein<i> Woman with Flowered Hat </i>(1963) <br>Photo: © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein New York / ADAGP, Paris, 2015

Roy Lichtenstein Woman with Flowered Hat (1963) 
Photo: © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein New York / ADAGP, Paris, 2015

Ultimately, as this final gallery argues, it is Picasso's vibrant dynamism and his absolute liberation from pictorial norms and expectations that gives his work its indisputable power—ever inspiring artists, as Faith Ringgold reflects in a short video, not to copy or imitate him but "to do their own ideas."

Picasso.Mania is on view at the Grand Palais in Paris from October 7 – February 29, 2016

Emily Nathan

Tourists Love Musée d'Orsay's 'Orgasmic' Prostitution Exhibition

Link: https://news.artnet.com/art-world/prostitution-exhibition-musee-orsay-341147?utm_campaign=artnetnews&utm_source=101715daily&utm_medium=email

Tourists Love Musée d'Orsay's 'Orgasmic' Prostitution Exhibition

Brian Boucher, Friday, October 16, 2015

Louis Anquetin Woman at the Champs-Élysées by Night.Image: Courtesy of www.musee-orsay.fr.

Louis Anquetin, Woman at the Champs-Élysées by Night(1890 – 1891).
Image: Courtesy of www.musee-orsay.fr.

Like it or not, prostitution has played a key role in art history. What is perhaps Pablo Picasso's defining masterpiece, Les Demoiselles d'Avignon, depicts women in a brothel. Édouard Manet's seminal painting Olympiashows a prostitute reclining on a chaise, boldly staring at the viewer, who assumes the position of her client.

But some French critics are skeptical about the motives behind the exhibition “Splendor and Misery: Pictures of Prostitution, 1850-1910," on view at Paris's Musée d'Orsay through January 2016.

The exhibition's opening had been briefly delayed by a strike over plans to keep the museum open seven days a week.

According to the Independent, comments in the official guest book indicate that visitors are “ecstatic." One even gushes, in English, in explicit terms: “This is an orgasmic exhibition which will go down in the anals [sic] of art history." Paris' Office of Tourism cites that 91% of visitors claim that "visiting museums and monuments" is one of the main reasons for their stay.

But critics have lined up to denounce the show, some suggesting that it's all about box office.

“Everyone knows that cultural budgets are being constantly nibbled away," writes Philippe Dagen, according to the Independent, “but is it really necessary to solicit visitors by showing naked women in lascivious poses and naked men exhibiting their genitals?"

Reutlinger, La Belle Otéro (1875-1917).Photo: Department of Prints and Photographs, Bibliothèque Nationale de France, Paris © Bibliothèque Nationale de France, Paris.

Reutlinger, La Belle Otéro (1875-1917).
Photo: Department of Prints and Photographs, Bibliothèque Nationale de France, Paris.

Harry Bellet, in Le Monde, compares the museum to a cash-strapped art-house movie theater showing smut to cover its financial losses on more high-minded screenings. He asks, “Is that the point we have now reached with big art exhibitions?"

Bellet is referring in part to a string of raunchy shows at the museum. One was devoted to the Marquis de Sade and was even promoted with a video showing an orgy. And the museum seemingly just can't escape the sexy: performance artist Deborah de Robertis hit the Orsay with a performanceof Gustave Courbet's explicit painting, The Origin of the World.

The museum dismisses the criticisms, pointing out that so many artists took on the subject as to make it central to the history of art. Organized buy the quartet of in-house curators Marie Robert and Isole Pludermacher, along with Edinburgh University art historian Richard Thomson and Nienke Bakker, curator at Amsterdam's Van Gogh Museum, the show also calls on the expertise of set designer and art director Robert Carsen for “scenography."

In what may be a veiled criticism, the museum administration may even be suggesting that the critics are juvenile. A warning on the museum's website reads, “Please note that some of the pieces presented in the exhibition may be shocking to some visitors (particularly children)."

After its run in Paris, the show heads to the Van Gogh Museum.

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See How Artists Discover Simplicity as an Art Form in Works Which Reflect the Golden Ratio

10/08/15 | by Vilém Stránský [mail] | Categories: osudy, ArtBohemia

Link: https://news.artnet.com/art-world/golden-ratio-in-art-328435?utm_campaign=artnetnews&utm_source=100815daily&utm_medium=email

See How Artists Discover Simplicity as an Art Form in Works Which Reflect the Golden Ratio

Lauren Palmer, Friday, October 2, 2015

Leonardo Da Vinci, The Last Supper (1494-99). Image: Wikipedia.

Leonardo Da Vinci, The Last Supper (1494-99). Image: Wikipedia.

Cartier

The art world has felt the influence of the Golden Ratio for centuries. Also known as the Golden Section or the Divine Proportion, this mathematical principle is an expression of the ratio of two sums whereby their ratio is equal to the larger of the two quantities.

During the Renaissance, painter and draftsman Leonardo Da Vinci used the proportions set forth by the Golden Ratio to construct his masterpieces. Sandro Botticelli, Michaelangelo, Georges Seurat, and others appear to have employed this technique in their artwork.

Gary Meisner on the Golden Number blog has mapped the geometric underpinnings of select paintings via software, which can be seen below:

Sandro Botticelli, The Birth of Venus (1483-85). Image: Wikipedia.

Sandro Botticelli, The Birth of Venus (1483-85). Image: Wikipedia.

Image: Gary Meisner, thegoldennumber.net.

Image: Gary Meisner, thegoldennumber.net.

Michelangelo, The Creation of Adam (1508-12). Image: Wikipedia.

Michelangelo, The Creation of Adam (1508-12). Image: Wikipedia.

Image: Gary Meisner, thegoldennumber.net.

Image: Gary Meisner, thegoldennumber.net.

In the 19th century, artists Georges Seurat and Edward Burne-Jones organized their compositions with the help of geometry.

Seurat's Post-Impressionist painting Bathers at Asinères (1884) can be broken down into three rectangles delimiting the fore-, middle-, and backgrounds, for example. And the arc of Burne-Jones's staircase is the focal point of The Golden Stairs (1876-1880), around which the other elements are arranged.

Georges Seurat, Bathers at Asnières (1884). Image: Wikipedia.

Georges Seurat, Bathers at Asnières (1884). Image: Wikipedia.

Edward Burne-Jones, The Golden Stairs (1876-1880). Image: Wikipedia.

Edward Burne-Jones, The Golden Stairs (1876-1880). Image: Wikipedia.

Though modernism drifts away from a strict use of the Golden Ratio, geometry figures heavily in many movements at this time. Clean lines and shapes in primary colors populate paintings and graphics, as evidenced by Constructivism, Suprematism, and De Stijl.

Kazimir Malevitch, Suprematist Composition (1916). Image: Wikipedia.

Kazimir Malevich, Suprematist Composition (1916). Image: Wikipedia.

Piet Mondrian, Composition with Yellow, Blue and Red  (1937–42) Courtesy: Tate Collection

Piet Mondrian, Composition with Yellow, Blue and Red (1937–42) 
Courtesy: Tate Collection

Moving into three dimensions, geometry figured heavily in the twentieth century. Sculptors Constantin Brancusi, Barbara Hepworth, and Henry Moore work abstractly, yet with simple, spare lines and forms.

Constantin Brancusi, Bird in Space (1927). Image: LACMA/© Constantin Brancusi Estate/Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris.

Constantin Brancusi, Bird in Space (1927). Image: LACMA/© Constantin Brancusi Estate/Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris.

Barbara Hepworth, Wave (1943-44). Image: © Bowness, Hepworth Estate/National Galleries Scotland.

Barbara Hepworth, Wave (1943-44). Image: © Bowness, Hepworth Estate/National Galleries Scotland.

Henry Moore, Three Points (1939-40). Image: © The Henry Moore Foundation/Tate.

Henry Moore, Three Points (1939-40). Image: © The Henry Moore Foundation/Tate.

Brazilian Neo-Concretism relies heavily on the simplicity of geometry: both Lygia Clark and Helio Oiticica's work is a mass of angles and blocks of color.

Lygia Clark, Planos em superfície modulada no. 2, versão 01 (Planes in modulated surface no. 2, version 1) (c.1957). Image: WNYC/Eurides Lula Rodrigues Cardoso.

Lygia Clark, Planos em superfície modulada no. 2, versão 01 (Planes in modulated surface no. 2, version 1) (c.1957). Image: WNYC/Eurides Lula Rodrigues Cardoso.

Helio Oiticica, Metaesquema ( ). Image: WikiArt.

Helio Oiticica, Metaesquema (1958). Image: WikiArt.

Last but not least, artist Salvador Dali resurrects da Vinci's "divine proportions" in his Surrealist homage The Sacrament of the Last Supper(1955), bringing us back to where we began.

Salvador Dali, The Sacrament of the Last Supper (1955). Image: WikiArt.

Salvador Dali, The Sacrament of the Last Supper (1955). Image: WikiArt.

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Joan Miró Show Opens in Zurich With Shocking Performance By His Grandson

Link: https://news.artnet.com/art-world/joan-miro-zurich-grandson-337454?utm_campaign=artnetnews&utm_source=100515daily&utm_medium=email

Joan Miró Show Opens in Zurich With Shocking Performance By His Grandson

Amah-Rose Abrams, Monday, October 5, 2015

Joan Miró, <i> Circus Horse </i> <br> Photo: courtesy of Galerie Gmurzynska

Joan Mirós, Circus Horse (1927) 
Photo: courtesy of Galerie Gmurzynska

Zurich's Galerie Gmurzynska opened its survey of Surrealist master Joan Miró's work this past weekend with an adventurous performance by the artist's grandson, Joan Punyet Miró, entitled Surrealism and Dadaism, the Awakening, and involving nudity, gun fire, and a Harley-Davidson.

The work of Joan Miró is instantly recognizable, despite the many evolutions the artist went through in his lifetime. This exhibition—which was 10 years in the making—brings together many elements of Miró's oeuvre, thus highlighting his rebelliousness and foresight as an artist.

Included in the exhibition are examples of Miró's painting, bronze sculpture, collage, textiles, and drawings. It's rare that a survey of a widely-exhibited artist still succeeds in providing new insights but the combination of works, especially the inclusion of textile based works, make this a show worth seeing.

Joan Miró<i>Untitled (titled Personnage by Matisse</i> <br> Photo: courtesy of Galerie Gmurzynska

Joan Miró, Untitled (titled Personnage by Matisse)
Photo: courtesy of Galerie Gmurzynska

CEO and co-owner of Galerie Gmurzynska—which this year celebrates its 50th anniversary—Mathias Rastorfer, agreed to host the performance after a chat and a handshake with Punyet Miró at Art Basel Hong Kong earlier this year.

Punyet Miró has spent his career writing on and researching his grandfather's work and was inspired to put on the performance after being repeatedly bored by museum exhibitions. He wanted to encourage viewers to remember just how groundbreaking the Modern art movement really was, he told artnet News ahead of the event.

Joan Miró, <i> Femme</i> <br> Photo: courtesy of Galerie Gmurzynska

Joan Miró, Femme, (1968) 
Photo: courtesy of Galerie Gmurzynska

“Museums are repeating themselves over and over again," Miro explained, not mincing his words. "There are too many curators and directors who repeat themselves. So you have lost the magic and the feeling. They might know more about my grandfather than I do, but they have no right to create exhibitions that feel like a trip to the dentist." Ouch!

"Going to a museum shouldn't feel like going to the dentist, after leaving an exhibition you should feel as though you have changed," he added.

Punyet Miró went on to explain that he felt artists today were not able to be as radical as they perhaps should be, due to the pressure to achieve repeated financial success.

"It's not just museums, it's also galleries, and art fairs, and so on… We've put art into a marketing concept and it has all become about goods, essentially," Rastorfer added. "When you deal with the Modern, very often you have the perception that people come and think 'Well, I know that already,' so how do you make people look again?"

Rastorfer and Punyet Miró see eye to eye on the matter. "What Joan is attempting, and what we are attempting to do, is to shock a little bit so people wake up. Emotions are an integral part of art, so if you separate that it becomes just about goods," Rastorfer explained.

Joan Miró, <i>Metamorphose</i> ()<br>Photo: courtesy of Galerie Gmurzynska

Joan Miró, Metamorphose (1939)
Photo: courtesy of Galerie Gmurzynska

After the opening, guests headed over to the after party at Razzia, a cinema converted into a restaurant, to see Punyet Miró's performance which he promised would "Rock you, baby!"

He rode into the plush restaurant on a Harley Davidson to the sound ofBorn to be Wild by Steppenwolf, dressed entirely in florescent pink, and started to talk through Miró's work and approach, as he sees it.

There was an awkwardness in the audience—which included Catherine Deneuve—as Punyet Miró proceeded to fire what appeared to be a genuine pistol (filled with blanks) into the air, weep with emotion when describing his grandfather's practice, and finally, strip naked, cover himself in neon paint and press himself into a giant canvas.

He peppered the over-the-top happening with personal and conceptual anecdotes about his beloved grandfather, which were both interesting and amusing.

He then concluded with a message, “artists aren't supposed to make money, they are supposed to make history," citing the competition between Marc Chagall, Pablo Picasso, and his grandfather to create new artistic techniques and styles up until the end of their lives.

The eponymous exhibition at Gmurzynska, around half of which is on sale, coincides with “Joan Miró: Wall, Frieze, Mural" at the Kunsthaus in Zurich.

Joan Miró will be on view at Galerie Gmurzynska until January 16 2016

Diana Widmaier Picasso Talks to Benjamin Genocchio About 'Picasso Mania' at the Grand Palais

Link: https://news.artnet.com/people/diana-widmaier-picasso-talks-to-benjamin-genocchio-334523?utm_campaign=artnetnews&utm_source=092415daily&utm_medium=email

VIDEO: Diana Widmaier Picasso Talks to Benjamin Genocchio About 'Picasso Mania' at the Grand Palais

Benjamin Genocchio, Tuesday, September 22, 2015

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It is not easy being the granddaughter of Pablo Picasso, the world's most famous artist.

But then again it does give you special insight into his life and work. Diana Widmaier Picasso has drawn upon her family history and art historical knowledge to curate "Picasso Mania," a new show organized in collaboration by the Réunion des musées nationaux—Grand Palais, the Centre Pompidou and the Musée national Picasso—Paris, opening at the Grand Palais in Paris on October 7th. Her two co-curators are Didier Ottinger, Associate Director MNAM-Centre Pompidou and Emilie Bouvard, curator at Musée Picasso.

The exhibition is about art but also about celebrity, in particular how Picasso became a popular cultural figure in addition to being the world's most famous artist. The exhibition at the Grand Palais is both chronological and thematic, highlighting key moments in Picasso's career and how they fed into the myth that was constructed around him and his name.

 

Photo: Courtesy www.emol.com.

Diana Picasso Photo: Courtesy www.emol.com.

 

The show looks at Picasso's influence across the 20th century on creative people working in a variety of different fields, including art, architecture, music, theatre and film. Displays run the gamut of media and techniques and include video, painting, sculpture, graphic arts, film, photography, and installation.

 

Benjamin Genocchio spoke with Diana Widmaier Picasso on camera about her new show, and her grandfather.

5 Legendary Art Dealers Who Struggled Before They Made It Big

09/23/15 | by Vilém Stránský [mail] | Categories: ze světa, osudy, ArtBohemia

Link: https://news.artnet.com/art-world/art-dealers-before-they-made-it-big-333258

5 Legendary Art Dealers Who Struggled Before They Made It Big

Christie Chu, Monday, September 21, 2015

Arshile Gorky and Fiorella La Guardia. 
Photo: Archives of American Art.

Art dealing can be glamorous, as well as culturally enriching, and there are certainly financial benefits to be gained. But those are just the upsides. All successful dealers will tell you that the climb to the top is uncertain, steep, and potentially treacherous. Even when you think you've achieved something, it may be even harder to maintain.

Below, we've gathered five art dealer stories that show the struggle is very, very real.

Michele Maccarone. Photo: Jason Nocito.

Michele Maccarone.
Photo: Jason Nocito.

1. Michele Maccarone
Michele Maccarone was a director at blue-chip gallery Luhring Augustinein New York when she decided to open up her own space in Chinatown. This sounds easy enough, except the year was 2001, and virtually no one had a gallery in the area.  Maccarone told Vice in a 2010 interview, "I was so broke that I had to actually live there. I lived in that building with no hot water, no shower, and no heat. My life was so derelict, I would shower at the Dolphin gym on Avenue B. And it smelled like dead rats. It was so raw." The dealer then joked that she takes "full responsibility for boug-ing up that neighborhood."

The New York-based dealer is planning on opening her second space in LA this September.

Larry Gagosian

Larry Gagosian

2. Larry Gagosian
Although he is now one of the art world's biggest players, with 15 galleries worldwide, Lawrence Gilbert "Larry" Gagosian came to his mega-watt art dealing career organically.

In an interview with collector Peter Brant in Interview magazine, Gagosian disclosed that he dropped out of college several times before graduating after six years. He worked at a free-press bookstore and record store while studying, eventually landing a job at William Morris Agency where he worked, briefly, for Michael Ovitz. After he was fired from the agency, he parked cars and then started selling posters on the street. In her memoir,Girl in a Band, artist Kim Gordon writes about her time as an assistant to Gagosian during his poster days. “He was erratic, and the last person on the planet I would have ever thought would later become the world's most powerful art dealer."

The rest is art world history.

Joel Mesler. Photo: PatrickMcMullan.com.

Joel Mesler. 
Photo: PatrickMcMullan.com.

3. Joel Mesler
Dealer Joel Mesler, who now co-runs two spaces with fellow dealer Zach Feuer, started his first gallery, Diane Pruess, in LA's Chinatown. Like Maccarone, Mesler spent the early 2000s living in his gallery, but unlike Maccarone, he built a makeshift bar and used it as an after-hours lounge-speakeasy. But after all the struggle of starting a gallery, his first show didn't gain any traction.

"The show was up for two months. It was never reviewed and I did not sell any work. I was 26 years old," Mesler wrote in Artnews. One day, Patrick Painter, a dealer who first showed Mike Kelley and Paul McCarthy, came by Mesler's new space, but not to check out the gallery. "Painter took a 20-minute shit in my bathroom and left," Mesler recalled. We're happy to report that Mesler is doing much better now.

 

Gavin Brown Photo: Clint Spaulding/Patrick McMullan.

Gavin Brown
Photo: Clint Spaulding/Patrick McMullan.

4. Gavin Brown
The UK-born dealer, who represents Rob Pruitt, Elizabeth Peyton, andRirkrit Tiravanija, told Art Review he came to New York in 1988 with $3,000 in his pocket: $1,500 from selling posters back home and $1,500 from his mother. When he arrived in New York, Brown found himself juggling between a lunch shift at the Tribeca brasserie Odeon and a night shift at the dive bar, Canal Bar.

After getting fired from the Odeon, Brown got by with odd jobs apartment-painting, until he landed a cushy job at a gallery. But that wasn't enough for Brown; in 1997, he opened a gallery with a beloved bar attached called Passerby, whose light-up disco floor was created by artist Piotr Uklanski. But how did he survive the harsh environment that is New York? "I sold art. There weren't any other options," he told Art Review. Brown, who also has a space in Rome, Italy, is now forging a new path; he recently closing his West Side space to open a new Harlem location.

Michael Werner. Photo: via W Magazine.

Michael Werner. 
Photo: via W Magazine.

5. Michael Werner
After being fired from his assistant position at a gallery for telling collectors the work on view was "shit," Michael Werner opened his own space in his tiny Berlin bedroom. In an interview with W magazine, Werner recalls his time "pretending to be a dealer" since he had no clients.

"You cannot imagine how it was," he told W. "All these artists had no success. And I was slowly disintegrating as a person. I would live at night and sleep during the day, to escape from it all." Today, Werner is credited with nurturing the careers of Georg Baselitz, whom he gave his first show,Sigmar Polke, and Jörg Immendorff, among other artists. He now has gallery locations in New York, London, and Germany.

Related stories:

Meet the New Generation of Young London Art Dealers

12 Must-Read Tips for a Successful Career in the Art World

14 Young New York Art Dealers To Watch

62 Women Share Their Secrets to Art World Success: Part One

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Strike Delays Opening of Prostitution Art Show at Musée d'Orsay

Link: https://news.artnet.com/art-world/prostitution-art-show-delayed-by-musee-d-orsay-strike-334486

ART WORLD

Strike Delays Opening of Prostitution Art Show at Musée d'Orsay

Sarah Cascone, Tuesday, September 22, 2015

Léopold Reutlinger, <em>La Belle Otéro</em>, from an album of photographs. Photo: Bibliothèque Nationale de France, Paris.

Léopold Reutlinger, La Belle Otéro, from an album of photographs. Photo: Bibliothèque Nationale de France, Paris.

Parisian museumgoers anxious to see Musée d'Orsay's new exhibition featuring artistic depictions of the world's oldest profession will have to wait. Due to a strike from workers protesting plans to keep the museum open seven days a week, the institution was forced to remain closed today.

The Musée d'Orsay announced the closure on Twitter. According to theNew York Times, the museum is currently negotiating with strikers and does not know when it will reopen.

"Splendor and Misery: Images of Prostitution 1850-1910," which includes historical artifacts such as police records as well as paintings and photos, was set to open September 22. The museum claims that the exhibition, which takes its name from Honoré de Balzac's novel The Splendors and Miseries of Courtesans, is the first major art show about Parisian prostitution.

Louis Valtat, Sur le Boulevard (La Parisienne). Photo: Mathieu Rabeau/RMN/ Fondation Bemberg.

Louis Valtat, Sur le Boulevard (La Parisienne).
Photo: Mathieu Rabeau/RMN/ Fondation Bemberg.

(The museum is no stranger to overtly sexual art, such as Gustave Courbet's L'Origine du monde [Origin of the World] and performance artist Deborah de Robertis's real-life reenactment of the painting, staged in front of the canvas this past June, or the orgy-ridden trailer for its Marquis de Sade exhibition.)

The planned change to the museum's opening hours, which was set to go into effect this fall, is part of French President François Hollande's plan to more evenly distribute crowds at the country's top three tourist attractions, which also include the Louvre and the Palace of Versailles, by keeping all of them open every day. Under the new arrangement, select groups, mostly from schools, would be able to visit the Musée d'Orsay on Mondays.

Jean Béraud, L'Attente. Photo: Franck Raux/RMN-Musée d'Orsay.

Jean Béraud, L'Attente.
Photo: Franck Raux/RMN-Musée d'Orsay.

Union leaders have been open with their concerns about the scheduling changes. Musée d'Orsay staff currently devotes Mondays to maintenance and organizational work, and fears that remaining open every day will strain an already understaffed operation, according to an open letter to the minister of culture.

This past year, the Musée d'Orsay welcomed 3.5 million visitors, while 7 million and 9.2 million people came to Versailles and the Louvre, respectively, with the latter expecting 12 million by 2025.

The show is scheduled to be on view through January 17.

Related Stories:

Musée d'Orsay Curator Sylvie Patry on the Origins of the Modern Art Market

Musée d'Orsay's "Dream Archive" Travels to Vienna

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'Picasso Sculpture' at MoMA Is a Rock-Solid Winner

09/10/15 | by Vilém Stránský [mail] | Categories: ze světa, ArtBohemia

Link: https://news.artnet.com/art-world/pablo-picasso-sculpture-moma-331454?utm_campaign=artnetnews&utm_source=091015daily&utm_medium=email


ART WORLD

'Picasso Sculpture' at MoMA Is a Rock-Solid Winner

Ben Davis, Thursday, September 10, 2015

Pablo Picasso, <em> Baboon and Young </em>(1951)

Pablo Picasso, Baboon and Young (1951)
Image: Ben Davis

“Picasso Sculpture" at the Museum of Modern Art is a show of riches, full of evidence of Picasso's sprawling creativity. But the first thing that drew me up short was something tiny, almost a footnote: The Venus of Gas(1945).

The rusty, vaguely anthropomorphic shape beams at you like a totem reclaimed from some alien civilization, full of plangent weirdness.

Pablo Picasso, The Venus of Gas (1943)

Pablo Picasso, The Venus of Gas (1945)
Image: Ben Davis

It also may be the closest that Pablo Picasso ever got to a true “readymade" of the Duchampian variety. It is little more than a stove burner turned on its end to unleash its totemic associations.

Picasso's engagement with sculpture was, as curators Ann Temkin and Anne Umland write in the catalogue, episodic. He would dabble in three dimensions, go back to painting for years at a time, then return to a totally new type of sculpture: wire constructions in the 1930s, ceramics in the 40s, sheet metal follies in the 50s.

“Picasso Sculpture," which opens to the public September 14, doesn't try to make one story out of this; it just tries to keep up. The result is a lovely, zigzagging journey full of greatest hits and surprises.

It looks remarkably fresh for a show dedicated to one of the world's most well-known artists. The Metropolitan Museum's “Cubism" show this past year was similarly stacked with undeniable treasures, but felt to medeadeningly genteel. This show feels more lively and present. I think there is an interesting reason for that.

Pablo Picasso, <em>Head of a Woman</em> (1941)

Pablo Picasso, Head of a Woman (1941)
Image: Ben Davis

The artistic world that Picasso came up in, in provincial Spain and cosmopolitan Paris alike, was one that was incalculably more rule-bound than the one we know today. His dealer, Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler, is said to have introduced to Picasso the then-novel concept that he might be a “painter-sculptor." The two disciplines were walled off from one another by different craft traditions, with sculptors requiring training in specific media, like clay and bronze, that Picasso did not have.

Pablo Picasso, <em>The Jester</em> (1905)

Pablo Picasso, The Jester (1905)
Image: Ben Davis

The earliest works featured at MoMA, coincident with his early Blue (1901-1904) and Rose (1904-1906) Periods, look quite conventional today because they still struggle to prove themselves before this tradition. The Jester (1905) is a refugee from the Rose Period's traveling circus, charming but relatively inert, rendered in a sentimentally rugged style.

Then Cubism kicks in. By 1912, Cubist slicing and dicing of subject matter had yielded up the idea of incorporating scraps of found materials onto the canvas surface: newspapers, fake chair caning, and so on. In sculpture, Cubism's pulverization of the conventions of depicting space proved less significant than its pulverization of conventions of what kind of media you could use. Suddenly, Picasso had license to play with non-art materials.

Pablo Picasso, Glass of Absinthe (1914)

Pablo Picasso, Glass of Absinthe (1914).
Image: Museum of Modern Art © 2015 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS).

His Glass of Absinthe, an edition of six bronzes from 1914 (in a curatorial feat, they're all gathered together for this show), exemplify the evolution. They are jagged little trophies, fractured renderings of the bohemian libation. Each is given a flourish of uniqueness with some surface painting, but is alike affixed with an actual absinthe spoon supporting a metal sugar cube. Assemblage had arrived in sculpture.

Amid Picasso's constant reinventions, the implication of this invention took a while to work its way through the system. The most famous of all Picasso's found-object works hails from several decades later, in 1942. Laboring amid the relative privation of occupied Paris, he grafted a bicycle seat to a set of handlebars, a mythic bull's head conjured from the detritus of urban life like the face of Jesus radiating from the Shroud of Turin.

Pablo Picasso, Bull's Head (1942)

Pablo Picasso, Bull's Head (1942).
Image: Ben Davis.

Bull's Head was cast in bronze, and what Picasso had to say about that decision is interesting:

The marvelous thing about bronze is that it can give the most heterogeneous objects such unity that it's sometimes difficult to identify the elements that compose it. But that's also a danger: if you were to see only the bull's head and not the bicycle seat and handlebars that form it, the sculpture would lose some of its impact.

With this quote, Picasso seems to stand at a crossroads between different ways of thinking about art. His sculptures vibrate with the energy of transmissions picked up from everyday material culture, but he is still committed to the ennobling virtues of traditional materials, afraid that these everyday materials won't add up to much on their own.

Pablo Picasso, <em>Baboon and Young</em> (1951)<br>The Museum of Modern Art / © 2015 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society

Pablo Picasso, Baboon and Young (1951).
Image: Courtesy Museum of Modern Art, © 2015 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society.

A lot of their character comes from this tension. He doesn't usually go as far as The Venus of Gas or Bull's Head, but the popular touch spills through everywhere, as in Baboon and Young (1951), a remarkably charming creature whose facial expression is formed—when you inspect it—from the body of a toy car.

Picasso aged much better in sculpture than he did in paint. As a painter, by the late 50s he was engaged in the task of obsessively repainting the Spanish baroque masterpiece, Las Meninas. These paintings are rather boring pastiches of Diego Velázquez—not to mention his own synthetic Cubism. They look backwards to the Great Tradition to steal a bit of gravitas.

Pablo Picasso, <em>Head</em> (1958)

Pablo Picasso, Head (1958).
Image: Ben Davis.

Maybe it's just good curating, but the late sculptures here feel much less enervated. A work like Head—made the year after the Las Meninas series, 1958—conjures a staring face with a wooden box, a board, and a couple of buttons. It retains a wily, untapped magic. Even the relatively cutesy painted wooden Bird (1958), which feels like a toss off, makes charming use of forks for feet.

Pablo Picasso, Bird (1958).
Image: Ben Davis.

As an artist, Picasso will always be associated with painting, and specifically with Cubism, the ur modernist -ism. Yet for all its transformative power, the specific theories of Cubist painting were dated for artists working a generation later, a mode consigned to a previous era of development.

Assemblage, on the other hand, was one of the main events of the century to come. It represented the conceptual innovation necessary for visual artists to adapt to a world of mass-produced industrial objects and ever-more intensive media images. And so, in the light of history, Picasso's sculpture ends up looking like it has more depth.

“Picasso Sculpture" is on view at the Museum of Modern Art from September 14, 2015–February 7, 2016.

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Record Picasso Is a Bigger Deal Than You Think

Sotheby's Sells Out Picasso Ceramics Collection

$27 Million Picasso Seized in Corsica

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Warhol's Famous Jews Stolen from L.A. Movie Studio and Replaced with Fakes

Link: https://news.artnet.com/in-brief/warhol-famous-jews-stolen-la-331173?utm_campaign=artnetnews&utm_source=090915daily&utm_medium=email

Warhol's Famous Jews Stolen from L.A. Movie Studio and Replaced with Fakes

Brian Boucher, Wednesday, September 9, 2015

Andy Warhol, Sigmund Freud, from from "Ten Portraits of Jews of the Twentieth Century," 1980. Photo via TMZ.

Andy Warhol, Sigmund Freud, from from "Ten Portraits of Jews of the Twentieth Century," 1980. Photo via TMZ.

Nine Andy Warhol's prints of Jewish icons like Sigmund Freud and Gertrude Stein valued at $350,000 has gone missing from the walls of a movie editing studio in Los Angeles. An industrious thief reportedly created fake versions of the works and installed them in place of the originals, according to TMZ.

The switcheroo came to light when a member of the family business took the works to a framer because he noticed that they were sagging. The framer tipped his customer off that they were fake, leading to a police investigation that trailed one of the stolen works to the Los Angeles outpost of Bonhams auction house.

The LAPD served a search warrant during August, but there's no word on whether the cops are any closer to the thief. An image of a missing signed screen print, Portrait of George Gershwin (1980), was recently posted on the LAPD Art Theft Detail page, and eight other missing works are also listed. "It's an ongoing investigation," Detective Don Hrycyk told artnet News in a phone interview.

A portrait of Freud from the series sold at Sotheby's Paris in June of this year for $537,500, according to the artnet auction price database, while a portfolio of the full set of 10 published by New York's Ronald Feldman Fine Arts fetched $266,500 at Sotheby's New York in November 2012.

Andy Warhol, Portrait of Sarah Bernhardt (1980). Image: Courtesy LAPD Art Theft Detail.

Andy Warhol, Portrait of Sarah Bernhardt (1980). 
Image: Courtesy LAPD Art Theft Detail.

Other than Freud, Gershwin, and Stein, the 1980 series also features Sarah Bernhardt, Louis Brandeis, Martin Buber, Albert Einstein, Franz Kafka, the Marx Brothers, and Golda Meir. Warhol referred to them as his “Jewish geniuses." He first created them as silkscreens on paper, but, according to the Jewish Museum, which exhibited them the year they were made, they were so successful that he did another edition on canvas.

The versions at the LA business had hung on the wall for three decades, according to the Daily Mail.

An e-mail to Bonhams seeking comment was not immediately returned.

Related stories:

European Andy Warhol Museum Loses Two Iconic Works in Shady Loan Agreement

Andy Warhol's Friends Reveal Little Known Facts On Eve of New Documentary

Warhol's Dollar Bill Fetches $32.8 Million at Sotheby's London

Experts Say This Ugly 'Warhol' Painting, Which Sold at Auction for $247,000, Is Un-Warholian

Follow artnet News on Facebook.


IN BRIEF

Warhol's Famous Jews Stolen from L.A. Movie Studio and Replaced with Fakes

Brian Boucher, Wednesday, September 9, 2015

Andy Warhol, Sigmund Freud, from from "Ten Portraits of Jews of the Twentieth Century," 1980. Photo via TMZ.

Andy Warhol, Sigmund Freud, from from "Ten Portraits of Jews of the Twentieth Century," 1980. Photo via TMZ.

Nine Andy Warhol's prints of Jewish icons like Sigmund Freud and Gertrude Stein valued at $350,000 has gone missing from the walls of a movie editing studio in Los Angeles. An industrious thief reportedly created fake versions of the works and installed them in place of the originals, according to TMZ.

The switcheroo came to light when a member of the family business took the works to a framer because he noticed that they were sagging. The framer tipped his customer off that they were fake, leading to a police investigation that trailed one of the stolen works to the Los Angeles outpost of Bonhams auction house.

The LAPD served a search warrant during August, but there's no word on whether the cops are any closer to the thief. An image of a missing signed screen print, Portrait of George Gershwin (1980), was recently posted on the LAPD Art Theft Detail page, and eight other missing works are also listed. "It's an ongoing investigation," Detective Don Hrycyk told artnet News in a phone interview.

A portrait of Freud from the series sold at Sotheby's Paris in June of this year for $537,500, according to the artnet auction price database, while a portfolio of the full set of 10 published by New York's Ronald Feldman Fine Arts fetched $266,500 at Sotheby's New York in November 2012.

Andy Warhol, Portrait of Sarah Bernhardt (1980). Image: Courtesy LAPD Art Theft Detail.

Andy Warhol, Portrait of Sarah Bernhardt (1980). 
Image: Courtesy LAPD Art Theft Detail.

Other than Freud, Gershwin, and Stein, the 1980 series also features Sarah Bernhardt, Louis Brandeis, Martin Buber, Albert Einstein, Franz Kafka, the Marx Brothers, and Golda Meir. Warhol referred to them as his “Jewish geniuses." He first created them as silkscreens on paper, but, according to the Jewish Museum, which exhibited them the year they were made, they were so successful that he did another edition on canvas.

The versions at the LA business had hung on the wall for three decades, according to the Daily Mail.

An e-mail to Bonhams seeking comment was not immediately returned.

Related stories:

European Andy Warhol Museum Loses Two Iconic Works in Shady Loan Agreement

Andy Warhol's Friends Reveal Little Known Facts On Eve of New Documentary

Warhol's Dollar Bill Fetches $32.8 Million at Sotheby's London

Experts Say This Ugly 'Warhol' Painting, Which Sold at Auction for $247,000, Is Un-Warholian

Follow artnet News on Facebook.


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