Scientists Discover the Legendary Secret Behind the 'Mona Lisa' Smile

08/21/15 | by Vilém Stránský [mail] | Categories: ze sv?ta, osudy, ArtBohemia

Link: https://news.artnet.com/art-world/secret-behind-mona-lisa-smile-discovered-326770?utm_campaign=artnetnews&utm_source=082115daily&utm_medium=email

Scientists Discover the Legendary Secret Behind the 'Mona Lisa' Smile

Amah-Rose AbramsFriday, August 21, 2015

Leonardo da Vinci, "Mona Lisa" (1503–1517)

Leonardo da Vinci, Mona Lisa (1503–1517)
Photo: Wikipedia Commons

One of the greatest mysteries in art history has been solved: British academics say they have discovered the secret behind the smile ofLeonardo da Vinci'Mona Lisa by studying a recently discovered portrait by the Renaissance master, La Bella Principessa.

By comparing the techniques employed in the two works, scientists from Sheffield Hallam University claim to have proved that the enigmatic "now you see it, now you don''t" effect of the Mona Lisa smile was intentional on the part of da Vinci. They have named it "the uncatchable smile."

The epiphany came by studying La Bella Principessa. The earlier painting, which portraits the young illegitimate daughter of a Milanese Duke, has the same effect as the Mona Lisa: from some angles the young lady seems to be smiling, from others, the smile appears to have vanished.

Leonardo da Vinci , <i>La Bella Principessa</i> (c. 1496)<br /> Photo: via <em>Art Daily</em>

Leonardo da Vinci , La Bella Principessa (c. 1496)
Photo: via Art Daily

"La Bella Principessa's mouth appears to change slant depending on both the viewing distance and the level of blur applied to a digital version of the portrait," the researchers wrote in a paper published in the journal,Vision Research, according to the Telegraph. "Through a series of psychophysics experiments, it was found that a perceived change in the slant of La Bella Principessa's mouth influences her expression of contentment."

Volunteers were asked to look at the painting from a variety of angles and distances. The conclusion was that, when focusing on the eyes of the painting, viewing from a distance, or when digitally blurred, a delicate smile could be seen. When viewed close up, or focusing on the mouth, however, the smile disappears.

The works were observed from different angles <br> Photo: via the <i> Telegraph</i>

The works were observed from different angles 
Photo: via the Telegraph

The effect, evident in both paintings, was achieved by using the sfumato(which means "soft" or "pale" in Italian) technique, which uses color and shading to create an optical illusion around the mouths.

"The results from the experiments support the hypothesis that there is a gaze-dependent illusory effect in the portrait of La Bella Principessa," said Alessandro Soranzo of Sheffield Hallam's psychology department. "Although it remains a question whether the illusion was intended, given Leonardo's mastery of the technique and its subsequent use in the Mona Lisa, it is quite conceivable that the ambiguity of the effect was intentional, based on explicit artistic skill and used in line with Leonardo's maxim that portraits should reflect some 'inner turmoil of the mind.'"

Until recently, La Bella Principessa was thought to be the work of a 19th century German painter, until it was discovered to be the portrait of 13-year-old Bianca Sforza, the illegitimate daughter of Ludovico Sforza, commissioned on the eve of her marriage in 1496.

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Beyoncé and Jay Z Pose with Mona Lisa

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Did Leonardo da Vinci Paint the Mona Lisa Twice?

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European Andy Warhol Museum Loses Two Iconic Works in Shady Loan Agreement

08/21/15 | by Vilém Stránský [mail] | Categories: osudy, z domova, ArtBohemia

Link: https://news.artnet.com/art-world/andy-warhol-museum-stolen-paintings-326430?utm_campaign=artnetnews&utm_source=082015daily&utm_medium=email

ART WORLD

European Andy Warhol Museum Loses Two Iconic Works in Shady Loan Agreement

Henri NeuendorfThursday, August 20, 2015

The Andy Warhol Museum of Modern Art in Medzilaborce, Slovakia. Photo: Wikimedia Commons

The Andy Warhol Museum of Modern Art in Medzilaborce, Slovakia.
Photo: Wikimedia Commons

Two works by Andy Warhol have disappeared from the Andy Warhol Museum of Modern Art in Medzilaborce, Slovakia, after being loaned to Arts Group, a Bratislava-based company, for “educational purposes."

The works are a Campbell's Soup Can painting and a Marilyn Monroe print. They have been missing since March, but it's only now that the museum has made the incident public.

The art expert Jaroslav Kraj?ák, who is working on the case, told The Slovak Spectator that the Campbell's Soup Can painting is worth an estimated €35,000 and the Marilyn Monroe print €500. Slovak police, however, estimated that the artworks could fetch up to six figures in the market.

According to museum officials, the institution had arranged similar loan agreements with the same company in the past, without problems. However, after the firm had failed to return the artworks, the museum began to suspect that the “irreplaceable" pieces may have been stolen.

One of the two missing works is a 'Marilyn' painting. Photo: The Mirror

One of the two missing works is a 'Marilyn' painting.
Photo: The Mirror

“The artworks which were loaned were collected by a security company with guns," Michal Bycko, deputy manager of the museum, told the Mirror. "They had all the relevant documents so there was no reason not to hand them over."

The Slovak Spectator reports that the missing works could have become ransom in a dispute between Martin Švajda, from Arts Group, and Herbert Gorge, an Israeli businessman. Gorge allegedly lent over €500,000 to Švajda to buy works from various artists, including Warhol. Some of these works were allegedly fakes and, as a result, Švajda got into debt, according to Hospodárske Noviny.

Slovakian government officials said the loan agreement was not signed between the museum and Arts Group, but between the museum and an individual. Meanwhile, Valika Ma?arová, the museum director, has been suspended on suspicion of being involved in the plot, after the irregularities in the loan agreement emerged.

A 'Soup Can' painting was also reportedly stolen from the museum. Photo: The Mirror

A 'Soup Can' painting was also reportedly stolen from the museum.
Photo: The Mirror

Veronika Fitzekova, a spokesperson for the local council of Presov, which runs the museum, said in a statement that Ma?arová was not cooperating with investigators, making it difficult for police to assess the relevant evidence. Police have also revealed that the Bratislava address stated in the loan agreement is deserted.

The museum, located in the north-east of the country, is only ten miles away from the birthplace of Warhol's mother, Julia Warhola, who lived there with her husband.

The museum's collection contains over 160 works, memorabilia and artifacts. It is the second largest museum dedicated to Andy Warhol, after the Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh.

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US Returns To France Seized $15 Million Picasso Smuggled as Christmas Gift

08/20/15 | by Vilém Stránský [mail] | Categories: ze sv?ta, osudy, ArtBohemia

Link: https://news.artnet.com/art-world/us-returns-seized-picasso-france-325029?utm_campaign=artnetnews&utm_source=081415daily&utm_medium=email

US Returns To France Seized $15 Million Picasso Smuggled as Christmas Gift

Henri NeuendorfFriday, August 14, 2015

Pablo Picasso La Coiffeusse Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images via AFP

Pablo Picasso La Coiffeusse (1911)
Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images via AFP

The United States returned a long-lost $15 million Pablo Picasso painting to France with an official handover ceremony at the French embassy in Washington on Thursday.

La Coiffeuse (1911) was seized by American customs agents in Newark, New Jersey in December 2014. The painting was discovered in a parcel sent from Belgium to Queens, New York, labeled as “art craft."

According to Kelly Currie, acting US attorney for the eastern district of New York, customs officials became suspicious because the package—shipped as a $37 Christmas gift—was addressed to a climate-controlled warehouse.

The painting was repatriated at an official handover ceremony at the French Embassy in Washington. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Yahoo News

The painting was repatriated at an official handover ceremony at the French Embassy in Washington.
Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Yahoo News

Its content turned out to be the long-lost cubist masterpiece reported stolen from the archives of Paris's Centre Georges Pompidou Museum back in 2001.

Currie emphasized, “The US is not an easy market for black market smuggling of art and antiques," adding that the case was resolved at an unprecedented pace.

Meanwhile, at the handover ceremony in Washington the US director of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Sarah Saldaña said, “There's a tremendous feeling of accomplishment when we return a piece of art like this… The message from ICE today is ‘This is part of our mission, a part of the work we do.'"

US Immigration and Customs Enforcement director Sarah Saldaña shakes hands with the deputy chief of mission at the French embassy, Frederic Dore. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Yahoo News

US Immigration and Customs Enforcement director Sarah Saldaña shakes hands with the deputy chief of mission at the French embassy, Frederic Dore.
Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Yahoo News

She went on to praise the American government agencies involved in the identification and repatriation of the artwork, “You saw some tremendous investigative work in detecting this piece to begin with and we will continue to do so."

According to AFP, the deputy chief of mission at the French embassy in Washington Frédéric Doré, applauded the “outstanding Franco-American customs cooperation."

However, Doré revealed that the artwork had suffered some minor damage and that it required restoration work to “come back to life," before being put back on public display in Paris.

Related stories:

Italian Police Bust Art Smugglers and Seize $16 Million Picasso

Purported Pablo Picasso Painting Seized by Iranian Police

Police Escort $28 Million Picasso Seized on Yacht to Madrid's Reina Sofia Museum

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11 Handy Hashtags for Navigating the Art World

08/20/15 | by Vilém Stránský [mail] | Categories: ze sv?ta, ArtBohemia

Link: https://news.artnet.com/art-world/art-hashtags-around-the-world-325584?utm_campaign=artnetnews&utm_source=081915daily&utm_medium=email

ART WORLD

11 Handy Hashtags for Navigating the Art World

Ben DavisTuesday, August 18, 2015

Photo by @missmillemaria, with Ron Mueck's "Boy," categorized under the #ArtWatchers hashtag

Photo by @missmillemaria, with Ron Mueck's "Boy," appearing under the #ArtWatchers hashtag
Image: Courtesy @missmillemaria Instagram

“I gave a lecture once where someone in the audience seriously asked, ‘is it true that you have to use at least five hashtags per Instagram post?,'" JiaJia Fei, the Guggenheim's associate director of digital marketing, told me recently.

The answer to that query is “no," but the fact that it stood out as a burning question shows that hashtags—which themselves have only been around since 2007, when they were invented by Chris Messina, a former Google employee—have become an important part of the way that art circulates via platforms like Twitter and Instagram, just as they have become a vital tool in politics, activism, and many other fields.

Major public art projects come pre-branded with hashtags (think Creative Time's #karawalkerdomino), and most big art events spawn their own (thus #whibi becomes the place where people share their gripes about theWhitney Biennial).

When it comes to tapping into conversations that escape a specific event, however, you quickly run into problems of clutter: because everyone on Twitter who has ever put a brush to canvas tags their painting #painting, it's not that useful. There are, however, a number of hashtags that are useful for keeping track of different key conversation in contemporary art, magic passwords that are more granular than #art but less specific than #JennyHolzerAtHauserAndWirthSomerset.

Below are 11 worth checking in on.

 

 

#artsed
The go-to tag for people who care about art as a vehicle of learning, and all the debates accompanying this important subject.

 

 

#artselfie / #museumselfie / #museumselfieday
Credit for coining #ArtSelfie goes to sharp art critic Brian Droitcoir. Its power has been undeniable—though you could overstate it: 23,000-plus Instagram mentions is impressive by art standards, but fairly modest in Internet terms (the feline-themed #catselfie has racked up 300,000-plus usages). Outreach and audience development departments, however, are betting on the power of the #ArtSelfie and its near cousin,#MuseumSelfie, to lure young people: #MuseumSelfieDay is set to returnnext year.

 

 

#artstudentproblems
Honestly this one deserves to be bigger than it is. But if you want a quick peek into the pungent anxieties of art school—or a place to vent about same—it's something. (Or perhaps the University of Florida's Arts Education program's hashtag, #ufarted, dubbed the "unofficial hashtag for arts education," is more your speed?)

 

 

#artwatchers
Behold, people looking at art around the world. If you love art and also love looking at the back of people's heads, this is the hashtag for you.

 

 

#askacurator
I have been so far underwhelmed by the results of the annual #AskACurator day. But the event, initiated in 2010 by prolific museum blogger Mar Dixon, is a great idea, and it returns September 16. More than 700 museums will be participating on Twitter; check Dixon's blog to see if one near you is on board.

https://twitter.com/SuzyKilkenny/status/302946405171990528

#emojiarthistory
Moribund at this point, but there's no reason why this classic bit of art nerdery couldn't break out again at any moment. In early 2013, a post on the LadiesUpFront Tumblr went art-viral. Soon, institutions including the J. Paul Getty Museum were posting emoji-based riffs on works from their collections, along with members of the public.

 

 

#emptymet
The brain child of Instagram maestro Dave Krugman, #emptymet became a sensation last year, capitalizing on people's fascination with deserted spaces by posting pics of New York's encyclopedic museum outside of work hours. That success has in turn inspired a rash of copycat #empty initiatives, including the recent #emptyfrieze.

 

 

#musejobs/#museumjobs
Yes, there is a quick and easy way to check what museum openings are currently being circulated on Twitter.

 

 

#musetech
The very fact that we are having this discussion about hashtags is proof that technology is reshaping how people relate to the museum experience. If you want to eavesdrop on the professionals talking about what's coming down the pipeline, check in with #musetech.

 

 

#partsofpaintings
The go-to for sharing details of paintings. A lot of random stuff gets filed under #partsofpaintings alongside the occasional gem, like a sharp Chuck Close close-up or a telling Roy Lichtenstein detail. Heavily associated with the street-art star KAWS.

 

 

#streetart
This one kills it on Instagram, with over 14 million appearances of the #streetart tag to date. It might be more interesting to get more granular: the most Instagramed city is London, with #streetartlondon racking up 125,000-plus uses; Paris is next, with #streetartparis scoring over 98,000; New York third, with 79,500 for #streetartnyc. Come on, New York, kick it in!

Thanks to Susi Kenna (@SusiKenna) and JiaJia Fei (@VAJIAJIA) for suggestions.

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Experts Say This Ugly 'Warhol' Painting, Which Sold at Auction for $247,000, Is Un-Warholian

Link: https://news.artnet.com/market/experts-say-painting-sold-auction-is-un-warholian-325877?utm_campaign=artnetnews&utm_source=081915daily&utm_medium=email

Experts Say This Ugly 'Warhol' Painting, Which Sold at Auction for $247,000, Is Un-Warholian

Brian BoucherTuesday, August 18, 2015

Stevens auction house offered this work, which it classifies as an Andy Warhol portrait of Coco Chanel.

Stevens auction house offered this work, which it classifies as an Andy Warhol portrait of Coco Chanel.

Mississippi auction house Stevens, which is mostly in the business of selling antiques and estates, is boasting of a $247,000 sale this month of an alleged portrait by Pop artist Andy Warhol of iconic fashion designer Coco Chanel.

The work had been estimated to sell for anywhere between $50,000 to $2 million, company president Dwight Stevens told artnet News by phone. Stevens said that his consultants guessed the date of the work to be early in Warhol's career, perhaps the mid-1970s.

Warhol began regularly showing his work in the 1950s and exhibited work at a show at the Museum of Modern Art in 1956.

“It's all a guess if you don't have proof," he said.

Though the work is said to bear the authenticating stamp of the artist's estate, something didn't seem right to the former Andy Warhol Museum director Tom Sokolowski, who didn't hesitate to give artnet News his assessment of the work by phone today.

"It looks more like Caitlyn Jenner than Coco Chanel," he said, adding, "it even looks like it was painted by Caitlyn Jenner! There's nothing about that work that bespeaks Andy Warhol in the slightest. How the authentication committee could have stamped it as authentic is just beyond any sentient person's imagination."

Critic Blake Gopnik, currently at work on a book on the artist, was equally skeptical in an email to artnet News.

“The ‘Coco' certainly doesn't look like any Warhol I've had the chance to see, even considering the range I've come across in his commercial work," Gopnik wrote. "If one day he'd woken up and decided to make something utterly new, and as ugly and stupid as the ‘Coco' painting—not entirely beyond imagining even with Warhol—we could never tell it was by him. (I'm researching such a case now, where some bizarre late works that look nothing like Warhols come with documents that suggest they could be by him.)"

Informed of the existence of skeptical expert opinion, Stevens was confident.

“We had numerous people look at it," he said. “We were relying on others. We brought in art dealers and so-called experts. They said it was really baffling to them because they hadn't seen anything quite like it, and that it could be one of his earliest works."

In the end, he said, it is up to the buyer to determine whether or not they believe it is a work by Warhol.

“I left it up to the bidders. They brought their experts, and they were satisfied."

“Executed in Warhol's inimitable style," says the house, the work in question is a monochrome image of the famous French designer in an imposing broad-brimmed hat, against a patterned background. It's not apparently based on a photograph, as were Warhol's most recognizable celebrity portraits, and it eschews the Pop artist's trademark bright hues. The work comes from an unnamed Dallas collector who bought it at a Canadian gallery, which Stevens identified as Jack Hamilton Gallery, in 1985. The buyer prefers to remain anonymous, Stevens said.

The Andy Warhol Foundation, contacted via email, stated its policy: "We do not offer opinions on works of art purported to be by Andy Warhol, whether on or off the record. The Andy Warhol Art Authentication Board (AWAA&amp;#66;&amp;#41; was authorized to cease operations in October 2011 and no longer exists."

A press release by the Aberdeen-based auction house and published onArtDaily indicates that the work is executed in “synthetic polymer and silkscreen ink on canvass" (sic), while a caption says that it is an oil on canvas. artnet News could not confirm details of the work or the prices, as Stevens is not part of artnet's auction price database.

The August 8 sale took place at the 1847 estate Lauri Mundi, and also included “a Marc Chagall original lithograph, along with other Victorian works of art." Chagall was 14 years of age when the Victorian era came to a close. Warhol was born 27 years later. Among the other treasures on offer in the 420 lots that went to the auction block were a 91-inch-high rosewood étagère with dragon carving from the Tennessee home of President James Knox Polk, which fetched $26,450, and a Baccarat crystal chandelier that went for $12,650.

The house does occasionally sell art. “We sold a Chinese plaque recently that was estimated at up to $10,000," said Stevens. “It brought $82,000."

For Southerners, the auctioneers seem a bit preoccupied with the heat on the day of the sale. “The weather was a bit warm," said Stevens, “but the crowd was lively and everyone had a good time." According to the house's website, cooling fans were made available to those in attendance.

Expect the heat to ratchet up, figuratively if not literally, at a sale in Natchez, “slated for sometime in mid-October," where the house will offer “another original portrait painting by Warhol from the same collection—this one perhaps even more desirable, because it depicts the late screen legend Marilyn Monroe."

 

Related stories:

Andy Warhol's Friends Reveal Little Known Facts On Eve of New Documentary

Hans Ulrich Obrist Says Beuys and Warhol Would Have Loved Instagram

Andy Warhol Gets Opera Inspired by His Life and Work

Warhol's Dollar Bill Fetches $32.8 Million at Sotheby's London

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Police Escort $28 Million Picasso Seized on Yacht to Madrid's Reina Sofia Museum

08/12/15 | by Vilém Stránský [mail] | Categories: ze sv?ta, osudy, ArtBohemia

Link: https://news.artnet.com/art-world/seized-picasso-brought-to-madrid-by-police-324406?utm_campaign=artnetnews&utm_source=081215daily&utm_medium=email

Police Escort $28 Million Picasso Seized on Yacht to Madrid's Reina Sofia Museum

Sarah CasconeWednesday, August 12, 2015

Pablo Picasso's Head of a Young Woman (1906) was found on a boat in Corsica, French authorities have said.<br>Photo: AFP via The Guardian

Pablo Picasso's Head of a Young Woman (1906) was found on a boat in Corsica, French authorities have said.
Photo: AFP via The Guardian

Spanish police have transferred a Pablo Picasso painting seized from a yacht off the island of Corsica to the Reina Sofia Museum in Madrid.

According to the Spanish police, the painting, Head of a Young Woman(1906), is worth €26.2 million ($28.7 million). A team of Spanish experts, including an art restorer and a professional art mover, retrieved the work from Corsica on August 11.

"The painting will be stored in a warehouse of the museum until we know more about its destiny," a museum spokesperson told AFP. The institution is home to one of Picasso's most famous works, the anti-war masterpieceGuernica.

The recently-seized artwork belongs to Spanish banker Jaime Botin, 79, brother to the late philanthropist Emilo Botín, of the Santander banking group.

Spanish Civil Guards bring Pablo Picasso's </em>Head of a Young Woman</em> to the Reina Sofia museum in Madrid.  Photo: Gerard Julien, AFP Photo.

Spanish Civil Guards bring Pablo Picasso's Head of a Young Woman to the Reina Sofia museum in Madrid.
Photo: Gerard Julien, AFP Photo.

The Spanish culture ministry had been blocking Botín's efforts to export the work since 2012, on the grounds that there was "no similar work on Spanish territory" from that period of the artist's life. In May, the Spanish courts sided with the government, issuing an export ban on the portrait due to its "cultural interest."

For his part, Botín contests the validity of the ban. His lawyers argue that Picasso painted the work when he was abroad, and that Botín bought the work in London in 1977. Additionally, over the subsequent decades, the painting has been stored on a ship bearing a British flag, and so is on foreign territory subject to British regulations despite being currently docked in Spain.

Jaime Botín<br>Photo: via ABC

Jaime Botín
Photo: via ABC

Experts have since dismissed these arguments as a "huge contradiction," pointing out that if they were valid, Botín would have never sought an export permit in the first place.

Corsican officials were tipped off in July that Botín was attempting to smuggle the portrait to Switzerland. Customs agents seized the work after the captain produced a document from the Spanish court preventing the painting from leaving the country.

 

Related stories:

$179 Million Picasso Sets Stratospheric Record

Spanish Politicians Busted for Money Laundering Involving Goya Paintings

$140 Million Picasso at Christie's

Spanish Dealer Arrested for Role in Knoedler Forgery Scam

 

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Jaime Botín's Lawyer Claims $27 Million Picasso Painting Wasn't Illegally Exported

08/06/15 | by Vilém Stránský [mail] | Categories: ze sv?ta, osudy, ArtBohemia

Link: https://news.artnet.com/in-brief/jaime-botin-lawyer-picasso-painting-not-exported-323153

IN BRIEF

Jaime Botín's Lawyer Claims $27 Million Picasso Painting Wasn't Illegally Exported

Lorena Muñoz-AlonsoThursday, August 6, 2015

Pablo Picasso's Head of a Young Woman (1906) was found on a boat in Corsica, French authorities have said.Photo: AFP via The Guardian

Pablo Picasso's Head of a Young Woman (1906) was found on a boat in Corsica, French authorities have said.
Photo: AFP via The Guardian

The legal representative of the banker Jaime Botín has sent a letter to the Spanish newspaper El País responding to Botín's Pablo Picasso painting being seized on a boat in Corsica, despite having been explicitly barred from leaving Spain by the Spanish National Court.

In the letter, the legal representative claims that Head of a Young Woman (1906) “was painted abroad, was bought abroad, and its permanent resident has always been abroad. Therefore, the painting has not been exported, neither legally or illegally."

Botín bought the painting in London back in 1977, and it has lived on his yacht ever since, according to the New York Times. It is widely thought to be a rare example of Picasso's Gósol period, named after the village in Catalonia where he lived and painted in the early 1900s.

The artwork is estimated to be worth around €25 million ($27 million), which is, admittedly, far less than the $179 million auction record for the artist, which was achieved at Christie's New York location this past May.

Jaime BotínPhoto: via ABC

Jaime Botín
Photo: via ABC

According to El País, the first export request was presented in 2012 by Christie's Iberica SL on behalf of the company Euroshipping Charter Company Ltd., linked to Botín.

The Committee for the Assessment, Valuation and Exportation of National Heritage Goods within the Ministry of Education, Culture, and Sport originally denied the request that same year, citing the work's enormous cultural value, and the Spanish National Court concurred with the assessment. The request was again denied in May.

But Botín's legal representative claims that the provisional ban to export the painting lacks grounds, since the painting "was not in Spanish territory when this was ruled, and neither has it been exported."

The lawyer's argument is based on the fact that Head of a Young Woman was located on a boat with a British flag, “which makes it foreign territory even when the boat is docked in Spanish ports. The port where the boat is registered and usually docked is London."

According to the El País report, however, the boat had recently been docking in Valencia, Spain.

Related stories:

$140 Million Picasso at Christie's

$179 Million Picasso Sets Stratospheric Record

Spanish Politicians Busted for Money Laundering Involving Goya Paintings

Police Arrest Brothers Who Sold a Fake Goya … and Were Paid with Fake Cash

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8 Secrets to Larry Gagosian's Success Revealed

08/06/15 | by Vilém Stránský [mail] | Categories: ze sv?ta, osudy, ArtBohemia

Link: https://news.artnet.com/people/secrets-of-larry-gagosians-success-322893?utm_campaign=artnetnews&utm_source=080615daily&utm_medium=email

8 Secrets to Larry Gagosian's Success Revealed

Cait MunroWednesday, August 5, 2015

Larry Gagosian, Jeff Koons, Aby Rosen. Photo: Neil Rasmus/BFAnyc.com

Larry Gagosian, Jeff Koons, Aby Rosen. 
Photo: Neil Rasmus/BFAnyc.com

Larry Gagosian has built a veritable art sales empire. From humble beginnings as a poster salesman in 1970s Los Angeles, Gagosian has climbed his way to the top. He currently operates 15 spaces in New York, London, Los Angeles, Rome, Athens, Hong Kong, Paris, and Geneva, where he represents some of the biggest names in contemporary art.

How does Gagosian do it? Magnus Resch, in his buzzy new book, Management of Art Galleries, has revealed some of the secrets to Gagosian's success. The book features case studies of various ultra-successful art dealers, and among them is Gagosian. While Resch was unable to speak directly to anyone from the gallery directly, he's culled information from unofficial interviews with gallery employees as well as profiles in Vogue and the Wall Street Journal.

Resch likens the structure of Gagosian to that of major corporations like Procter & Gamble, but it sounds like the gallery is also surprisingly progressive. Here, we've boiled down the Gagosian case study to its essence, for helpful guidance for anyone looking to follow suit (though you may also want to read Jeffrey Deitch's advice, in the same book, about the perils of following suit).

1. Reserve personal time for your most important clients
Larry is reportedly fastidious about getting face-to-face time with his biggest clients—these include hedge fund manager Steve Cohen, Christie's owner Francois Pinault, financier Leon Black, publishing magnate S.I. Newhouse, and philanthropist Eli Broad—but only them. Plebeians, just try to get a word with the man.

2. Hire women
While hiring a staff of articulate, well-heeled women isn't exactly a revolutionary business practice in the gallery world, women make up a staggering 75 percent of Gagosian's employees. Gagosian is so well-known for his coterie of female staffers that Vogue ran a 2011 spread profiling several "Gagosiennes." Aside from that though, as per Resch, there is "no discernible common thread in their backgrounds."

Larry Gagosian and Takashi Murakami.  Photo: Clint Spaulding/Patrick McMullan.

Larry Gagosian and Takashi Murakami.
Photo: Clint Spaulding/Patrick McMullan.

3. Go with your gut when hiring
While Gagosian has poached his fair share of talent from auction powerhouses like Christie's and Sotheby's, he's also hired people with little prior art world experience—and at least one who doesn't have a college degree. He is typically intimately involved in the hiring process, and hires based on gut instincts. "He's hired people without knowing what they're going to do, just to keep them from slipping away," artist Cecily Brown revealed to Vogue.

4. Trust your employees
With spaces all over the world, Gagosian relies on a team of trusted directors to manage day-to-day operations and liaise with big-name artists and collectors. Each employee is reportedly assigned to manage an artist, while collectors are assigned to whomever the dealt with upon first contact.

5. Don't waste time on small talk
While directors and other key employees are often on calls with Gagosian multiple times a day, he doesn't waste time with small talk or other niceties like "hello" and "goodbye." He's also not interested in hearing about what tasks employees are currently engrossed in, often uttering the phrase: "I don't want to know what you're working on. I want to know when it's done."

Larry Gagosian

Larry Gagosian

6. Sales, sales, sales
The best way to get ahead at Gagosian? Sell some art. A lot of it. "You are only as good as your next deal," one employee told Vogue.

7. Reward hard work
Gagosian's salaries are among the best in the industry, according to Resch, and employees earn a 10 percent portion of the gallery's commission when they close a deal. Bonuses are awarded to those who lure prime artists to the gallery, and those employees even get 10 percent of that artist's sales for the next year.

8. Have a sense of humor
Larry isn't the first person that springs to mind when we think of a jokester, but it turns out, he has a pretty good sense of humor. In an email to his staff, he once wrote: "Today is my birthday. Please sell something."

Related stories:

Gagosian Opens Third London Gallery In Pursuit of World Art Market Domination

Larry Gagosian Has $925 Million Worldwide Revenue And Plans New Los Angeles Gallery

Larry Gagosian Welcomes Bono and Other Celebrities to Wild Hamptons Estate Parties

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London Gallerist Discovers Rare Monet Taped to Back of Pastel Bought at Auction

07/05/15 | by Vilém Stránský [mail] | Categories: ze sv?ta, osudy, ArtBohemia

Link: https://news.artnet.com/market/london-gallerist-rare-monet-hidden-310946?utm_campaign=artnetnews&utm_source=062415daily&utm_medium=email

London Gallerist Discovers Rare Monet Taped to Back of Pastel Bought at Auction

Lorena Muñoz-AlonsoWednesday, June 24, 2015

Claude Monet, Le Havre, la jetee (c. 1868) discovered taped to another pastel by the artist<br>Photo: Philip Toscano via The Guardian

Claude Monet, Le Havre, la jetee (c. 1868) discovered fastened to another pastel by the artist
Photo: Philip Toscano via The Guardian

Jonathan Green, director of London's Richard Green Gallery, hit the proverbial dealer's jackpot when he unwittingly purchased three pastels by Claude Monet at a Parisian auction in 2014 for the price of two.

After returning home, Green noticed that there was something fastened to the back of one of the two rare studies of skies that he had bought for an undisclosed sum—it turned out to be another pastel which depicts a jetty and a lighthouse at Le Havre in Normandy, where the legendary artist grew up.

The paper conservator Jane McCausland was hired to remove the tape, which revealed the secret Monet pastel. “We were very excited," Green told the Guardian. “Pastels by him are incredibly rare. These are a pointer to his future … You can see his fascination with light."

Moreover, the provenance of the three pastels is phenomenal—it links back directly to the artist, as all are thought to date to 1868, when Monet was still a struggling artist.

The pastels by Claude Monet bought by dealer Jonathan Green at auction<br>Photo via: Richard Green gallery

The pastels by Claude Monet bought by dealer Jonathan Green at auction
Photo via: Richard Green gallery

The pastels by Claude Monet are currently for sale at the London art fair Masterpiece<br /> Photo via: Richard Green gallery

The pastels by Claude Monet are currently for sale at the London art fair Masterpiece
Photo via: Richard Green gallery

They were Monet's wedding present in 1924 to Anne-Marie Durand-Ruel, the granddaughter of his dealer Paul Durand-Ruel, the first modern art dealer and Impressionist champion, and most recently the subject of a major exhibition at London's National Gallery.

Starting today, all three rare pastels are on display and up for sale at the London art and antiquities fair Masterpiece, for a combined total of £1.4 million ($2.2 million).

This is a momentous event, since, according to the gallery, the pastels have not been exhibited since 1928 and the 2014 auction marked their very first outing in the art market, as they had remained within the Durand-Ruel family until then.

“It's very unusual to have three Monet pastels," Susan Morris, senior researcher at Richard Green gallery, told the Guardian. “They really don't come up that much. It's also exciting to have it from Durand-Ruel, the man who created Monet's career."

Photograph of Paul Durand-Ruel in his gallery, taken by Dornac, about 1910 Archives Durand-Ruel

Photograph of Paul Durand-Ruel in his gallery, taken by Dornac, about 1910
Photo: Archives Durand-Ruel

Finding pieces taped to the back of works, or hidden in frames is a far more usual occurrence than it might seem at first. Last February, the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia discovered two previously unknown sketches by Paul Cézanne on the backs of two important watercolors that hang in the galleries of the foundation.

Follow artnet News on Facebook and @selfselector (Lorena Muñoz-Alonso) on Twitter.

Artist Finds Possible Picasso from His Estranged Father in the Attic

07/05/15 | by Vilém Stránský [mail] | Categories: ze sv?ta, osudy, ArtBohemia

Link: https://news.artnet.com/art-world/painting-picasso-found-in-attic-312021

ART WORLD

Artist Finds Possible Picasso from His Estranged Father in the Attic

Amah-Rose AbramsFriday, June 26, 2015

Could Dominic Currie be holding a genuine Picasso?<br> Photo: via the <i> Scotsman</i>

Could Dominic Currie be holding a genuine Picasso?
Photo: via the Scotsman

Scottish pop artist Dominic Currie may have discovered a Pablo Picassorolled up in a suitcase given to his mother by his father, a Russian soldier, in the 1950s.

Currie never took his mother seriously when she claimed that she had a painting rolled up in a suitcase in the attic. When clearing out her house, he was about to throw a suitcase away when he thought he should open it to have a look at what was inside.

“It was a bombshell," he told the Scotsman. “We had thought ‘Let's just get this to the skip, let's do it'. […] we unrolled it and it was sack cloth with German writing on it. Inside it there was this old oil cloth underneath and newspapers from the Soviet Union in the 50s."

In 1998 Currie discovered that his biological father was a Russian soldier, Nicolai Vladimirovich, that his mother had met on holiday in Poland in 1955 when she was nineteen. The lovers had met up following the birth of their lovechild with Currie's mother Annette making trips behind the iron curtain.

Is the painting genuine? <br> Photo: via the <i>Scotsman</i>

Is the painting genuine? 
Photo: via the Scotsman

Vladimirovich gave her the painting knowing that, as a single mother, she would struggle financially. It seems she put it in the attic for a rainy day and left it there forgotten, until now.

The painting has now been sent to Christie's London to undergo a process of authentication. If the painting turns out to be real, Currie intends to sell the Cubist work in accordance with his parents wishes.

“It's a wonderful gift. It's like a message from both of them to me," said Currie of the find. “That's how it feels. It's like, “Here son, we're going to look after you. It's taken a wee while but we've got there."

Pablo Picasso handling Gary Cooper's gun (1958). Photo: André Villers.

Pablo Picasso handling Gary Cooper's gun (1958).
Photo: André Villers.

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